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These moms know exactly what it’s like to get through the ups and downs of motherhood – and they have the stories to prove it.

 

“I remember going to school for a holiday party where you decorated gingerbread houses. I didn’t know you were supposed to prepare the house ahead of time. My daughter is looking at me saying, “Why didn’t you build one?” Everybody else had one, but I didn’t know. But then I became friendly with some of the stay-at-home moms, and now they text me to tell me what’s coming up.”
Dr. Renee Kendzierski of SJRA, at our 2016 Women’s Empowerment Series

 

 

“One of the things I think about all the time and I try to tell my women executives is that 10 minutes isn’t worth it. You’ll never remember that meeting you missed. It may seem like the all-important meeting of the world, but you need to be where you need to be and where your child expects you to be, if you can.”
Brenda Bacon of Brandywine Living, at our 2016 Women’s Empowerment Series

 

 

“I made a conscious decision that I was going to do everything in my power to be at all the major points in my daughter’s life. Once, she had a track meet on the day there was a vote in the Senate. I had somebody drive me up to the field entrance, and I ran out and waved to her as she ran by. Then I ran back to the car and went to the vote. She never knew when I left.”
N.J. State Senator Dawn Marie Addiego at our 2016 Women’s Empowerment Series

 

 

“I get up at 4:30 am and workout, because if I wait until later in the day, it’s not going to happen. I know I’ll feel better if I work out, and I’ll notice it if I don’t.”
Angela Rubino Hines of Rubino Service Company, at our 2016 Women’s Empowerment Series

 

 

“When I first had my son, I felt very off balance, because I had been working probably 14-hour days forever. I started looking around for someone I thought was a really good mom and really good at what she did. I came upon my friend, Mindy Holman, and asked if she would mentor me. At our first talk, I asked her, “Do you ever feel guilty about work and kids?” She said, “Every day.” So that freed me up to feel guilty. I don’t feel so bad knowing that’s a reality – that someone who has done such an obviously great job feels guilty too.”
Jodina Hicks of Urban Promise, at our 2015 Women’s Empowerment Series

 

 

“I knew I didn’t have anything in the refrigerator for dinner, so I stopped at Boston Market and I got all these different things. I came running into the house, and I was breathless. I’m putting things together, and the guys are standing in the kitchen. They’re saying, “Hi Patty, how are you?” And I’m saying, “I’m fine. I’m so sorry, guys. I’m so sorry it’s so late. Look what time it is.” And I’m whipping everything out on the table. And Alex, the 14-year-old who’s now 34 and who I adore, looked at me. He said, “Patty, Patty, Patty, wait a minute.” And I said, “What, honey? What?” And he said, “You don’t have to try so hard. It’s going to be OK.”
CBS 3 Anchor Pat Ciarrocchi at our 2015 Women’s Empowerment Series

 

 

“The difference between my husband and I is that he focuses on what he can control and I obsess about what I can and can’t control. I wish I was more like him, and I worry about what I model for my children. I see how intense my daughter controls her life and my son is very focused and I think, ‘Am I teaching them enough balance?’”
Angela Snyder of Fulton Bank of New Jersey at the 2013 Women’s Roundtable

 

 

“The guilt is there every day. It’s either work or the home or family. Then when your parents are sick, you’re in an in between situation where your kids are getting older and now your parents need you. And they did a lot to help and I was very close to my mom. I would think, ‘I should’ve been there for that doctor’s appointment.’”
Deborah Hayes of Archer Law at the 2013 Women’s Roundtable

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